Allow me to introduce you to one of my favorite desserts: the pizookie. It'll be your favorite, too.

I've been making these since college, but I guess I've been holding out on sharing them. The concept is about as simple as it gets. You put cookie dough into a ramekin. Bake it until it's just starting to brown on the top. Pull it out of the oven, and put a big scoop of ice cream on top.

The next few minutes are pure bliss. The cold ice cream combines with the warm cookies. Everything is melting together. Your mind goes blank. You're not sure if you've ever had anything so good in your life, etc.

This is the easiest thing on my blog. You can use homemade cookie dough if you have time -- I have in the past -- but Tollhouse and Pillsbury are in every grocery store for a reason. They save you time and they've spent decades perfecting the recipes. These pictures are made with Tollhouse and Turkey Hill French Vanilla.

I gave my roommate and longtime #1 recipe taste-tester the extra pizookie after taking pictures. She's had them multiple times since I make these any time I'm tasked with dessert and don't feel like baking before dinner. After we finished them (mine was already half gone from taking pictures), she confessed that even though she knew these were easy, she thinks they're the best thing I make. I can't really take credit for store-bought cookie dough and ice cream, but seriously...they might be.

I have only tried pizookies with variations of chocolate chip cookie dough. I also prefer them with vanilla ice cream (probably the only time plain vanilla is my preference) or cookie dough if I'm really feeling the cookie vibe. There are an endless number of potential combinations. I'm sure they're all great.

You can make this in any ramekins you have around the house. You will need to adjust the amount of cookie dough you add and cooking time based on your choice. The amounts I've detailed below are guidelines based on the ramekin size I was using. You can adjust the recipe based on the number of servings and the ramekin size. I usually fill them a little over half full if I'm using smaller ramekins (4-6oz). The key is to cook them until each pot is just slightly starting to brown around the edges. The top will be set, but it's still soft in the middle.


Serves: 4
Total Time: 15 Minutes (3 Active)

16oz Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough
4 Scoops Vanilla Ice Cream


Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Fill each ramekin with approximately 4oz of cookie dough (cookie dough should be about 1-inch deep in the ramekin). Place on cookie sheet. Bake the cookie sheet of ramekins on the middle rack for 12-16 minutes*, or until cookie dough is just starting to brown around the edges and the top is set. Do not overbake! Cookies will be cooked through, but the inside should still be soft.

Remove from oven, let sit for two minutes, and top each ramekin with a cold scoop of ice cream, pressing down slightly in the center. The ice cream will start melting right away, so DIG IN! Make sure not to hold the ramekins without a napkin or something to prevent you from burning your hands (since this would really cut down on the enjoyment factor).

*Time range varies based on ramekins used, amount of dough added, and oven.

And since I was going to eat the pizookie anyways, I documented:
Immediately after dropping ice cream on the pizookie.

Eating and photographing. Photographing and eating.
And then all the bites start looking like chocolate chip cookie dough ice cream, which is never a bad thing.
Perfection. (Put down the camera to focus on eating)

And this is what it looks like if you don't eat it right away.

You might think my vice would be chocolate based on this blog, my eating habits/daily chocolate consumption, or any number of things I say that allude to chocolate holding a very prominent place in my heart and stomach.

I do love me some chocolate, but cinnamon is the secret (or not so secret) ingredient in the more than half of my favorite desserts. I can't even make coffee cake or cinnamon rolls with any frequency anymore because I will help myself to five servings without thinking twice. All self-control goes out the window.

So, let's talk about Cinnamon Chex. I'm not sure where Cinnamon Chex has been all my life, but I am rapidly making up for lost time. These Browned Butter Churro Crispy Treats are my new favorite recipe (Chex=Crispy, Rice Krispies = Krispy?).

I've probably made them 10 times in the past month. They are incredibly easy, and the flavor is something no one is expecting since it's reminiscent of Rice Krispies, but made with Chex and BROWNED BUTTER. It is the perfect, no-bake dessert to fix when you need something in a pinch and don't feel like turning on your oven or breaking out the mixer.

The only remotely difficult part is browning the butter, and I promise once you get the hang of it, browning butter won't be a deterrent in the least. The key is that you have to watch the butter. Do not multitask when making browned butter. Like all serial multitaskers, I like to think that because I multitask all the time I've mastered the art of it. Nope. We can put this in the long list of things that should not be multitasked. I've provided a few pictures and examples below, but there are also great tutorials here and here.

The last thing I will say about this recipe is that it nails the crisp to marshmallow ratio that is essential to any krispy/crispy dessert. Your treat should not crack in half when you break it apart. If this happens, you might as well be eating a cereal bar. It should bend. That said, eating these for breakfast is perfectly acceptable since they are, after all, made with cereal.


Browned Butter Churro Crispy Treats
Recipe from Well Plated by Erin


6 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 tablespoon Imperial Sugar Dark Brown Sugar
1 tablespoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
10 ounces miniature marshmallows
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
6 cups Cinnamon Chex

  1. Butter or coat with non-stick spray an 8-inch square pan.
  2. In a large pot, melt butter over medium-low heat. Continue to heat until butter melts, then foams, then turns clear golden, then starts to turn brown and smell nutty. Stir frequently, scraping up any bits from bottom as you do. Watch it carefully, especially in last minute, to ensure butter does not burn. As soon as butter turns light brown, turn off heat, then stir in brown sugar, cinnamon and vanilla.
  3. Add marshmallows and stir to melt. The heat of melted butter should be enough to melt marshmallows, but if necessary, turn heat on low and stir until marshmallows are smooth and no white streaks remain.
  4. Remove pot from stove and stir in the cereal and salt. As soon as cereal is coated, spread it quickly into prepared pan. To spread cereal to corners, lightly coat a sheet of wax paper with cooking, then evenly press it into pan corners. Let cool 15 minutes, cut into bars and serve.
Note: The steps below show examples from various points the process. They do not correspond directly with each stage, but your butter will look like all of these during the process. I removed my butter shortly after the second to bottom image. When it starts to look like this keep stirring and keep a very close eye on it. It's almost done, and it goes from brown to burnt faster than you'd expect!

Exhibit A & B: Bend, No Snap